Tolstoy or dostoevsky an essay in contrast 1960

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The key Russian words here are krasivaya and khorosha . 2 Tolstoy uses the first, meaning “beautiful” or “pretty,” in the sentence referring to the old days when Dolly dressed to be admired. He uses the second, meaning “good” or “fine,” in writing of Dolly’s present selfless purpose. Garnett’s “She looked nice” conveys the sense of the passage as no other translator of Anna Karenina into English has conveyed it. Louise and Aylmer Maude (some readers prefer their version of the novel to Garnett’s) write “She looked well,” which is better than P&V’s “She was pretty.” But Garnett’s “She looked nice” is inspired.

Tolstoy or dostoevsky an essay in contrast 1960

tolstoy or dostoevsky an essay in contrast 1960

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