Danny poet welsh playwright essayist novelist

It ought, perhaps, to be made clear that Dannie Abse's use of a single symbol extended is by no means unique; Auden, Spender and Day Lewis made single-symbol structures not infrequently, and Thom Gunn, writing in the early fifties, developed the practice independently, if ultimately from the same source. Where Dannie Abse differs is in providing a symbolic concept which is familiar or commonplace and in avoiding structures which are themselves esoteric or demand special knowledge even before the probably abstruse philosophical point is inserted. This, of course, is a generalisation that can be refuted in detail. If one accepts that every reader has some idea, preferably some visual idea, of men in armour fighting a battle hand-to-hand in open country, then Thom Gunn's poem The Byrnies struggles into the category that already holds many of the poems in Tenants of the House. But more often with Gunn there is a concept that appears to exist for its own sake, as in The Court Revolt, or is shot through and through with external commentary to such an extent that almost every rag of detail has an interpretation pinned to it. That well-known poem ‘On The Move’ is built on a scaffolding of this sort, flying its rags like bunting.

Danny poet welsh playwright essayist novelist

danny poet welsh playwright essayist novelist

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