Aristotle and beyond essays in metaphysics and ethics

In the period between his two stays in Athens, between his times at the Academy and the Lyceum, Aristotle conducted most of the scientific thinking and research for which he is renowned today. In fact, most of Aristotle's life was devoted to the study of the objects of natural science. Aristotle's metaphysics contains observations on the nature of numbers but he made no original contributions to mathematics. He did, however, perform original research in the natural sciences, ., botany, zoology, physics, astronomy, chemistry, meteorology, and several other sciences.

Aristotle’s theology is based on his perception that there must be something above and beyond the chains of cause and effect for those chains to exist at all. Aristotle perceives change and motion as deep mysteries. Everything is subject to change and motion, but nothing changes or moves without cause. Tracing how things cause one another to change and move is the source of many of Aristotle’s most fundamental insights. He believes that all causes must themselves be caused and all motion must be caused by something that is already in motion. The trouble with this belief is that it leads to an infinite regress: if all causes have antecedent causes, there is no first cause that causes motion and change to exist in the first place. Why is there change and motion rather than stillness? Aristotle answers that there must be a first cause, an unmoved mover, that is the source of all change and motion while being itself unchanging and unmoving. To motivate the heavens to move, this unmoved mover must be perfect, so Aristotle comes to associate it with God.

Photo credits:
God as Architect/Builder/Geometer/Craftsman , The Frontispiece of Bible Moralisee; Unknown circa 1220-1230 [Public Domain], via Wikimedia Commons {PD-US}
Sixteenth century engraving of Claudius Ptolemy (AD c100-170) being guided by the muse Astronomy - Margarita Philosophica by Gregor Reisch, published in 1508 [Public Domain], via Wikimedia Commons {PD-1923}
Aristotle  by Francesco Hayez [Public Domain], via Wikimedia Commons(1791–1882) {PD-US}
Nicolaus Copernicus  by Unknown, [Public Domain], via Wikimedia Commons {PD-1923}
Peter Paul Rubens [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons {PD-US}

Aristotle and beyond essays in metaphysics and ethics

aristotle and beyond essays in metaphysics and ethics

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